Maps Challenge Traditional Columbus History

Ancient Newfoundland Maps Challenge Traditional Columbus History Note: A peer-reviewed article about transatlantic trade between Newfoundland and Europe before Columbus is featured in the Winter Edition of the Portolan Journal by the Washington Map Society – November 2016. Newfoundland on “Italian Portolan”  c.1482 State Archive Collection Florence, Italy Document: “Nautical Chart VI” * This image is from a Russian language book about ancient maps by Bozhidar Dimitrov, Bulgaria in the Medieval Maritime Mapmaking, Sofia: 1984, Plate 31. This item was obtained from a used book dealer by associate Robert Ness for the New World Discovery Institute in Seattle. Dating and authentication of the map was by Italian scholars.   Introduction: Was America “Isolated” from Contact before Columbus? American historians have clung tenaciously to a long-standing belief that the New World continents were effectively isolated from Old World contacts until after the 1492 Voyage by Christopher Columbus. This concept of “New … Continue reading

Marco Polo in Seattle

Traditional historians missed all the clues. Marco Polo says in his Travelogue that he sailed with a Chinese expedition “40 days beyond Siberia.” He mentioned “pumpkins,” “cochineal dye,” “brasilwood,” and “corn.” All of these are New World plants. Polo mentioned that it took him and his father four years to travel from Venice to China in 1271. They could have made the journey in less than six months. Get the book now! Why did it take so long? Did Marco sail someplace beyond the Far East? And, why did he mention so many New World plants? These are just a few of the puzzling questions that led a Seattle crew of “Time Detectives” to undertake an exhaustive study of cartographic evidence. We also examined a chest-full of Marco Polo’s letters in the “Rossi Collection.” These documents are virtually unknown to historians – yet they give us a fresh new look … Continue reading

Jacob Ziegler 1532 map of Gronlandia (Greenland)

Ziegler’s Map shows the location of “Codfish Land” at the extreme southern coast of a huge Northern Continent that included the Arctic Isle of Green Land as well as the East Coast of North America. Terra Bacallaos (arrow) represents Newfoundland – which was the principal source of cod. Read more … … Continue reading

New Book from Misty Isles Press & Lulu.com

Victorious! Queen’s Champion, Prince Henry Sinclair

by Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D.

During the Late Middle Ages – in the 14th century – Queen Margaret Atterdag of Denmark welded together the bickering kingdoms of Scandinavia.  As the Little Ice Age bore down upon the Nordic Settlement on Greenland, she called upon her Champion, Prince Henry Sinclair, and Templar Knights, to rescue 4,000 stranded farmers. These Greenland refugees were brought south to new homes with Native Tribes along the Eastern Seaboard of North America: New England.

This masterpiece of “True History” is a supercharged foray into 14th century events in Ancient America and Northern Europe – featuring pirates, Native Americans, the incomparable Queen Margaret, and a Nordic Jarl.

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New Book Includes:

  • Prince Henry’s many New World Voyages for Codfish & Furs;
  • “Promise Church” in Greenland built by Templar Masons;
  • Norse-Scottish medieval “Stone Tower” in Newport, RI, c.1375;
  • The “Greenland Exodus:” Nordic farmers brought to new homes on the Eastern Seaboard;
  • Queen Margaret’s Kalmar Union & Northern Commonwealth;
  • Medieval Hanseatic fish and lumber bases on Newfoundland;
  • Prince Henry & Templar Knights defeat the Frisian Pirates in 1398
  • Early Venetian Maps of Rhode Is., Cape Cod, & Newfoundland;
  • 1898 photos reveal Scottish lime kiln beneath Colonial house;>
  • Marco Polo’s Chinese maps of Greenland & Baffin Island; and
  • Collateral Research from Clan Historian – Niven Sinclair.

 

 Read more about this book OR Get the book now!

Previous books by Dr. Gunnar Thompson book, including “Marco Polo in Seattle”, are still available.

MPS-front-SoftTraditional historians missed all the clues. Marco Polo says in his Travelogue that he sailed with a Chinese expedition “40 days beyond Siberia.” He mentioned “pumpkins,” “cochineal dye,” “brasilwood,” and “corn.” All of these are New World plants. Polo mentioned that it took him and his father four years to travel from Venice to China in 1271. They could have made the journey in less than six months. 

Why did it take so long? Did Marco sail someplace beyond the Far East? And, why did he mention so many New World plants? 

These are just a few of the puzzling questions that led a Seattle crew of “Time Detectives” to undertake an exhaustive study of cartographic evidence. We also examined a chest-full of Marco Polo’s letters in the “Rossi Collection.” These documents are virtually unknown to historians – yet they give us a fresh new look at events that changed the course of history. You will be astonished by what we discovered. 

Marco Polo wasn’t just a famous journalist who happened to write a Travelogue about the Far East. He was a highly-skilled espionage agent. He went to China on a mission for the pope. And yes — he sailed into the waters of Puget Sound, Seattle, and the Salish Sea. We have the map to prove it!

Get this book now!

Early Maps of New England

King Arthur’s Colony at Norumbega —Newport, Rhode Island & Queen Margaret’s Colony in the 14th Century —also— Early Maps of Narragansett Bay & Cape Cod – 1414 & 1507 by Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D. Summary Mercator’s World Map of 1569 included the legendary City of “Norombega.” Mercator believed it was the site of King Arthur’s Capital City that was established with a Welsh Colony in the 6th century. Nor-bega simply means: “North Settlement.” Placement of this “lost city” beside Narragansett Bay has haunted historians for centuries. Equally baffling is the French decision to ignore a 1524 reconnaissance by Giovanni Verrazano. He described the “Bay of Refuge” as the ideal location for a colony. Newly identified cartographic evidence indicates that Cape Cod and Narragansett Bay were charted on a 14th century map that John Ruysch copied and published in 1507. Historians believe this document is absolutely authentic. They completely overlooked the early … Continue reading

Medieval Templar Foundations in Rhode Island

Medieval Templar foundations, an ancient tower, have been identified in Newport, Rhode Island. Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D. New World Discovery Institute Seattle, Washington – 28 August 2014     Gerhard Mercator identified “Norombega” as the Capital City of a New World colony. Mercator’s Map of 1569, shown above placed this thriving city of fur trappers and traders along the Eastern Seaboard of North America. It was right in the vicinity of modern-day Newport, Rhode Island. Text on Mercator’s Map identified King Arthur of Wales as the sponsor of the first settlement at this location in the 6th century. Scandinavian and Germanic interest in this region commenced with the wild tale that was told by a storm-tossed Icelandic mariner – Bjarni Herjolfsson. He reached the Arctic Island of Greenland in 996 AD. Bjarni made landfall after a nasty gale pushed his vessel along the shore of a vast forested wilderness south-west of … Continue reading

Yuan Dynasty Foundation of Zheng He’s Voyages

Yuan Dynasty Foundation of Zheng He’s Voyages By Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D., Director New World Discovery Institute, Seattle, Washington< Library of Congress Presentation, May 16th 2005 Zheng He Symposium (This article is background information for an  Illustrated Presentation of this topic) The countries and peoples of East Asia had a curiosity about the world that reaches back into antiquity for thousands of years. As far back as the days of the Founding Emperors, the ancestors of the Chinese people engaged in seafaring adventures across the globe. They sailed in the company of mariners from India, Vietnam, Indonesia, Korea, Japan, Cambodia, Persia, Kamchatka, and from other regions of the Far East. Many of these mariners reached the shores of the New World where they contributed to the rich ethnic and cultural fabric of the Native Peoples. They returned to Asia with a variety of New World plants including maize (corn), tobacco, and … Continue reading

New Perspectives on Hyperborea and the “Magnetic Isles”

By Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D., July 1, 2000 Abstract (or go to the Article Text) Discovery of an early 15th century world map is shedding new light on ancient tales of New World exploration.  The map in question is an authenticated Venetian map by Albertin DeVirga circa 1414.  This map includes a Hyperborean continent called “Norveca” with features recognizable as the East Coast of North America.  The accuracy of this coastline and the Nordic nomenclature suggest that DeVirga’s Hyperborean continent is a copy of the long-lost map from Inventio Fortunatae. Numerous 16th century geographers including Gerhard Cramer, Abraham Ortelius, and Richard Hakluyt gave credence to the testimony of a Dutch journalist who recorded the exploits of Franciscan friars in the New World.  According to the journalist, an English friar had traveled throughout “Dusky Norway” using an astrolabe to record the locations of places that he visited on the way.  The biographers … Continue reading

Events in the Nordic Heritage of New World Discovery

Nordic Heritage of New World Discovery compiled by Gunnar Thompson, Ph.D. Director, Multicultural Discovery Project International Heritage Society 6000 BC   Small groups of maritime hunters traveled across the North Atlantic in skin boats and dugout canoes following migratory birds and mammals.  They are known as the “Marine Archaic culture” in Scandinavian pre-history and as the “Red-Paint People” in New England archeology. 550 AD    Jordane’s History of The Goths reports Swedish-Germanic voyages to isles in the Western Sea. 770 Pope Gregory IV refers to the forested isle of “Greenland” (i.e., North America) in the far west. 800 Climatic Optimum Unusually warm weather in the northern latitudes results in excellent growing seasons on farms and rapidly expanding populations in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark.  Young Vikings and traders sail to the Black Sea, the Mediterranean, and to isles in the far west (North America). 865 Viking settlements in Iceland 981 Eric the Red’s … Continue reading

New Found Land

New Found Land by Gunnar Thompson A 15th-century world map might be the key to a mystery that has confounded historians for almost five centuries: the identity of legendary isles near the North Pole. The map, by Venetian cartographer Albertin DeVirga (ca. 1414), surfaced at a Croatian antique store in 1911. This map has recently attracted the attention of historians due to claims that it shows parts of North and South America long before voyages by Columbus, Vespucci, Cabot and Verrazano. An Austrian collector named Albert Figdor found the map, and he brought it to the attention of Franz Von Wieser–a famous Austrian scholar–who verified authenticity of the document.  Several peculiar features on the circular map defy Medieval tradition: a continental land called “Norveca” extends out from the coast of Norway; a peninsula juts out toward the north; and across northern Europe is a huge territory representing Hyperborea of Roman … Continue reading

Marco Polo’s New World Maps

Marco Polo’s New World Maps: Does Evidence of Magnetic Variation Support Claims of Early Chinese Expeditions? by Gunnar Thompson Swedish historian Leo Bagrow (1948) crossed the threshold of academic propriety by suggesting that Marco Polo had sailed to the West Coast of North America in the 13th century.[1] Bagrow’s theory concerning Marco Polo’s whereabouts during his sojourn in the Far East (1275-1292) was based on evidence contained in documents that a California merchant named Marcian Rossi had donated to the Library of Congress in the 1930s. It was Bagrow’s intention to begin the process of evaluating the authenticity of these documents in the hope that others would follow suit. However, Bagrow’s pioneering effort has been met only with silence from colleagues in cartography. The author’s recent examination of the documents has led to the conclusion that “magnetic variation” or “declination from True North” may well prove to be an indicator … Continue reading

How Myths Became Realities at the Hands of Portuguese Cartographers

From “fantasy isles” to Continents: How Myths Became Realities at the Hands of Portuguese Cartographers by Gunnar Thomspon Summary The Portuguese Isle of Antillia is generally regarded as one of the “fantasy islands” of medieval mariners.  However, scientific data from 13 Atlantic charts now reveals that Portuguese navigators under Prince Henry and John II accurately determined the location of Florida by 1489.  These charts include the works of Albertin DeVirga, Andrea Bianco, Fra Mauro, Henricus Martellus, Martin Behaim, Cantino, and Caveri.  The accuracy of Portuguese maps explains the Columbus claim that he had an accurate map showing the way across the Atlantic in 1492.  His belief that the overseas mainland was The Indies resulted from a Portuguese effort to confuse commercial rivals.   * * * * * When 16th century historians set about writing the story of maritime exploration, they lacked many pertinent documents that would later surface.  Thus, … Continue reading

How the Portuguese Misled Columbus

HOW THE PORTUGUESE MISLED COLUMBUS by Gunnar Thompson  Summary When Columbus reached Cuba in 1492, he actually believed that he had arrived in Asia.  Why not?  After all, he had found land precisely where it was indicated on his Portuguese maps.  His enthusiasm for achieving the impossible—finding a western shortcut to the Orient—so impressed the Majesties of Spain that they promptly applied to Pope Alexander VI for a monopoly to preserve this “priceless” avenue of commerce. Secretly, King John II of Portuguese was overjoyed.  Thanks to the efforts of English Franciscans and the pioneering expeditions of Prince Henry, his explorers had already charted New World coastlines from Labrador to Brazil.  Alone among European sovereigns, he already knew that the coast of Asia was several thousand miles beyond the shores of the new western continent.  As the misguided pageant of New World discovery continued to unfold, Portuguese rivals squandered their maritime … Continue reading

Admiral Zheng He part 1

by Gunnar Thompson Presented at the Library of Congress, May 16th, 2005 Introduction: Marco Polo’s Role in Yuan Mapping When Ming Emperor Zhu Di sent his servant Zheng He on voyages to explore the west he gave him two principle directives. The first required him to bring diplomats from all the world’s nations to China. The second directive required him to develop a worldwide system of maritime commerce. In order to achieve these royal mandates, Admiral Zheng He needed accurate maps. Fortunately, the Admiral’s mission was aided by a substantial archive of world geography. Explorers in the previous Yuan Dynasty had already mapped many New Lands in America. Evidence of Yuan Chinese exploration has reached the West mainly through the writings of the Venetian spy  Marco Polo.  The Travels of Marco Polo, is a 13th-century travelogue written down by Rustichello da Pisa from stories told by Marco Polo, describing Polo’s … Continue reading